About your Search

20130318
20130326
STATION
MSNBCW 12
KQED (PBS) 6
CNNW 5
CSPAN 5
KRCB (PBS) 4
CNBC 1
KGO (ABC) 1
LANGUAGE
English 41
Search Results 0 to 40 of about 41 (some duplicates have been removed)
now by two upstarts. lapid and bennett, both of whom are not focused in the main on foreign policy and security issues but on social and economicnes so it's a paradox, in order to maintain his relevance as a foreign policy national security guy-- which is his strong suit-- the fact is he does need a better relationship with obama because obama holds the key on that front, certainly on iran. >> reporter: speaking of iran-- and i'll come back to that relationship-- is what the president saided in an interview with israeli television, will that comfort israelis? >> it certainly should comfort israelis. after all, the record suggests that the administration has worked very, very hard on the iranian challenge and the president has said that take my word, we're not interested in containing iran, we're interested in preventing iran from developing nuclear technology. i think it should assuage israelis who are concerned about this issue i wonder why-- and this seems to be part of the conversation in washington-- that israelis need an american president to show some deep emotional attachmen
and deficit thing. another is that i think the republican party has to make clear what its foreign policy is. it has had two wars for the past 12 years, people are still settling in and thinking, the voters have said, we don't like that. we're not for that. the republican party has to make clear what it stands for and it is going to have a little bit of debate to get there. those two big things and the policies that spring from them will make all of the difference, so will an eventual compelling presidential candidate. somebody who is involved right now. at the end of the day, it's the candidates who resolve a lot of unresolved things by taking a stand and speaking forcefully for it. >> that was bill clinton after walter mondale lost it. after jimmy carter lost. we had a dynamic governor who was reformed minded and brought those issues into the national forefront. he really helped recharge the democratic party. you know, the republican party is out to lunch. i watched cpac, karl. karl was a former friend. >> i thought i was a current friend? >> you're always a friend, you owe me some chili.
look at them as the experts in foreign policy and military intervention. how long do you have to be and on how big a scale before we stop listening. i would like to hear about acid reflux, or home remedies for boils. when it comes to the wisdom of invading iraq, you have expired, all of you have. you had your time, you failed, it is over.failed. it is over. "first look" is up next. >>> good morning. it's the first day of spring. right now on "first look", obama makes his inaugural visit. >> new information about the explosion that killed our marines when a mortar ground exploded. >>> inside the sinister murder plot hatched by a central florida student. >> everybody stuck on a plane wanted to order a pizza. meet the group that did. >>> and what's that jumping out of the trunk of the car. president obama will arrive in israel has his first visit as commander in chief. it comes as peace plans remain elusive. nbc news white house correspondent peter alexander joins us live from jerusalem. peter, good morning. >> good morning to you. a beautiful day here in jerusalem. you can see t
on the syria situation and other foreign policy challenges. joining me tonight is the chairman of the house intelligence committee, congressman mike rogers. mr. chairman, thank you for being here. >> thank you for having me. >> bret: let's start in syria. what do we know about the possibility of chemical weapons being used there? >> if you take the whole body of work, from the intelligence reports over the last two years, i believe it's highly probable that chemical weapons were used at least in some small amounts in syria. which is in violation of the chemical weapons convention. >> bret: now, foreign policy magazine, they have this quote. syrian support group, s.s.g., the only american organization licensed by the u.s. government to send money directly to the fsa, which is on the ground in syria, issued a press release yesterday claiming the gas that killed civilians in separate instances, two separate instances near me das cuss was a chemical agent similarlant found -- schismlant found in pesticide. it causes similar effects like muscle, nerve, respiratory death. >> do you believe it's t
there was a role in america's foreign policy. he wants america to pull back. he pointed to a split within the republican party on national security before almost anybody else did. he really actually outlined some of the divisions. when you look at his policies what he stands for, abolishing the departments of education, commerce, trade, the federal reserve. i think when he gets more out there in the public, when he's not just giving a talk at cpac, i just think that what he says is going to be too extreme for members of the republican party who support still the hawkish line of american involvement in the world and i think for clearly when he gets into i think into middle america, for running for anything like a presidential nomination that would be a very tricky position, some of those domestic issues, too. >> eugene, this is coming at a time that the gop is trying to reconfigure, the autopsy, what do you do to a corpse to bring it back to life? there are specific policy recommendations, raines preeb is's document. one was about gay marriage and one was about immigration. how do you move
the significance of this visit and what it means for u.s. foreign policy moving forward. when we come back, the water cooler watching democracy at its finest. another political brawl in the ukrainian parliament. we have diving and fighting in the parliament. more details when "way too early" comes back. max and penny kept our bookstore exciting and would always come to my rescue. but as time passed, i started to notice max just wasn't himself. and i knew he'd feel better if he lost a little weight. so i switched to purina cat chow healthy weight formula. i just fed the recommended amount... and they both loved the taste. after a few months max's "special powers" returned... and i got my hero back. purina cat chow healthy weight. >>> all right. time for the water cooler. democracy in action. ukrainian style. check it out in the parliament yesterday. where is it going to start? always looking for where it's going to start. push, push, push. just a melee breaks out. fistacuffs. somebody obviously spoke russian and they want to speak ukrainian. there was nearly an identical brawl back in decem
of his top strategic foreign policy advisors and he assumes because that is the sentence that is focused on that is what he wants to come out of the press conference. >> bret: next up, the two leaders on syria and the developing situation with the possibility of chemical weapons. ♪ looking for a litter with natural ingredients that helps neutralize odors. discover tidy cats pure nature. uniquely formulated with cedar, pine, and corn. >>> i am deeply skeptical of any claim in fact it was the opposition that used chemical weapons. i made clear that use of chemical weapons is a game changer. i won't make an announcement today about the next steps because we have to gather the facts. when you start seeing weapons that can cause potential devastation, and mass casualties, a you let that genie out of the bottle, then you are looking potentially at especially more horrific scenes than we have already seen in syria. >> bret: president obama talking about the possibility of the chemical weapons were used in syria. the house intelligence chairman mike rogers says there is a high probably now the
foreign policy guru who will bring us up to date on what the president is up to in the middle east and his syria in fact use chemical weapons as has been reported. and the republican party engaged in a sort of a civil war. we'll get into that, but first -- >> announcer: this is the "full court press." >> espn releasing president obama's complete march madness yesterday as the men's tournament gets underway today. number one louisville, indiana, ohio state, and then florida. and he believes that indiana will beat louisville on n the title game. on the women's side baylor connecticut, and california. his final pick for that will be revealed tomorrow. >> bill: i didn't do the women's bracket. >> i don't the women's bracket. i'm sorry. >> bill: we'll let you know our picks later this hour. >> michelle obama was at the [ inaudible ] to celebrate easter and brought bo with her. she handed out bo-shaped cookies, and handed out tickets to the easter egg roll at the white house. >> bill: that fisher house is a great, great program. really, really do good stuff. >> yeah.
is for a generation republicans dominated politics on three issues -- foreign policy, taxes, and social issues. among social issues, they won the battle and lost the war. there is no single social issue in your favor going forward. on taxes, you stand for giving breaks to the rich. and on foreign policy, they did not support the bush foreign policy, so the issues that made that republican party dominant, all three issues are in democratic favor. until you deal with these problems, it does not matter what network you have. economic conservatives and smaller government, less intrusion, and with they will have to figure out how to mollify the social movement. >> i do not think anyone has suggested the only thing that republicans are waiting right now is doing any better databases and do we need more storefront offices. i was responding to a question directly about that. there is a lot of discussion going on right now about positioning, policies, looking for some of integrating new program pauses, how do we explain our policies better. i do not accept the premise that there is no doubt when you look at t
and director of the foreign policy program at the brookings institution in washington, d.c. and david makovsky is the director of the project on the middle east peace process at the washington institute for near east policy. welcome to both of you. martin, let me start with you. as the president goes to israel, what will he find in general terms in this new government? what do we know or not know? >> well, it's only a couple of days old. so it's a very hard to tell exactly what it's going to shape up to. what we have is right wing party with a shift within the likud further in the right in terms of its composition. we have a large center party, lapid, this new rising star. then to his left is tzipi livni who was the only candidate to campaign on the two-state solution. he only got 56. >> brown: somehow they all worked together or were supposed to work together. >> there's a special glue on the seats of israeli cabinet chairs which kind of keep them stuck there for a while at least. they have to respond to their constituency. that is the key point here. their constituents wants them to focus on
of the president's bigger failures on foreign policy of the first term in office. though it's a failure that he didn't necessarily have a lot of control over. at the beginning of his first term, the president declared with great fanfare he wouldn't follow the lead of his predecessors presidents clinton and bush and wait until a second term to push for middle east peace. >> we're not going to wait until the end of my administration to deal with palestinian and israeli peace. we're going to start now. >> instead, not only did the peace process go nowhere, it's actually taken a step back. when the president sets off for israel on tuesday, he travels with very low expectations. that's probably the bit of good news. from the outset the president pressed israel hard on what a two-state solution would look like. >> israelis must acknowledge that just as israel's right to exist cannot be denied, neither can palestine's. the united states does not accept the legitimacy of continued israeli settlements. it is time for these settlements to stop. >> president obama's relationship with israeli prime ministe
one but there are very serious foreign policy issues here, not the least of being the civil war in syria. the white house says it is looking into allegations about the use of chemical weapons. the house and intelligence committee says there is quote high probability that chemical agents were useed. what will prime minister netanyahu be asking of the united states in terms of ending the on flikt in syria? >> well, first of all, the president, president obama's, credibility is very, very critical. they is said from the white house podium that any use from the chemical weapons would be a red line. presumably this would be the trigger for more american involvement. as you know, craig, u.s. has been behind other allies, britain and france pressing on the u.s. to do more. we have done human. aid, nonlethal aid, helped to the combatance, but not what they have been pleading for. which is more weaponry. so there's a lot of pressure on the white house to become more involved in syria. this is skoesten shl because they have to wonder about what will follow the civil war. if assad is going
netanyahu and called the u.s. and the jewish state unbreakable. mr. obama also covered big foreign policy issues including the iranian threat and the civil war in syria. cnn's john king is live in jerusalem with the latest. john, all seemed very maty and chummy. but underneath all that, what is the reality of the state of the relationship between america and israel right now? >> reporter: there's no question, piers, obvious to the world, not just to these two leaders, they've had a frosty and unfriendly relationship. president obama is left of center, believes the prime minister netanyahu has said some things he finds insulting or didn't like. prime minister netanyahu right of center, supported romney in the last presidential election, has at times stopped at president obama, my language, doesn't get it. both of these guys just won elections. they are in the words of a top american official the other day, stuck with each other. and it's very crystal clear today, both of them have decided to try to turn a new page. are they going to be best friends, i think not. but are they going to be be
back in the '90s. he's now the vice president director of the foreign policy program at the brookings institution here in washington. he's joining us from new york. martin, i thought this was one of the most important speeches that an american president has ever delivered about the situation between the israelis and the palestinians. but give me your thoughts. >> i agree, wolf. you said it was bold. i would say it was courageous. not just in terms of making the case to the israeli public, that they do have a partner, that peace is possible, but actually urging them to pressure their leaders to move forward. he is famously being quoted before our elections as saying that he considered the leadership in israel as political cowards. he seems to be going over their heads to the israeli young people, trying to give them hope and trying to encourage them to press their leaders to make peace. and that is, i think, a very bold and courageous thing. but i would say one other thing. he, having tried to lower expectations about this visit, has now raised them sky high in terms of the expectation
this country's foreign policy, the direction of its economy, and the security of it is citizens. the president is in israel, where he delivered a major speech calling again for a two-state solution in the middle east. in congress, house republicans successfully parsed paul ryan's third budget blueprint, likely to never become law. >>> but we begin with a moment of deep frustration this week. after an assault weapons ban was dropped from senate legislation, while two top gun reform advocates continue to push for reform. in new york earlier today, vice president joe biden and new york city mayor michael bloomberg held a press conference with families of the sandy hook elementary school massacre. delivering a unified message to congress -- get some guts. >> it's time for the political establishment to show the courage your daughter showed. >> quite honestly, i'm really ashamed to see that congress doesn't have the guts to stand up and make a change and put a ban on these types of weapons and universal background checks. >> congress just has to get some courage and it's up to us as americans and a
. not to apologize for their role in arguably the worst foreign policy disaster and deception in a century, but to say actually it wasn't a disaster or a decepti deception, it was a great idea and they're not sorry and everything worked out great. >> you try to do everything you can diplomatically, without resort to force, but our history is replete with examples where ultimately we had to use force. >> and the argument this was a war you wanted? >> wanted? why, because we like war? i did what i did. it's all on the public record. and i feel very good about it. if i had to do it over again, i would do it in a minute. >> i feel very good about it. what's there to feel bad about? one of dick cheney's main cohorts in selling the iraq war to the american people was this guy, deputy defense secretary paul wolfowits, her was his contribution to the discussion this
: joining me martin indyk, director of foreign policy brookings institution, also a former u.s. ambassador to israel. and itamar rabinovich served as israel ambassador to the united states. at the same time he was chief negotiator with the syrian government and president and founder of the israeli institute. i'm pleased to have both of them at this table, at this time, when the president i saying some very interesting things in israel. so welcome. >> thank you. >> thank you. >> rose: characterize this speech by the president. >> this speech was typical obama at his best, working his oratorical magic on a crowd that lapped it up. he spoke very convincingly about his commitment to israel's security and his understanding of their security dilemmas. and particularly underlined what he was going to prevent iran from getting nuclear weaponsment buthen he went into a rif about peace and the necessity of peace and the possibility of peace, and why peace has to be just, even saying put yourself, you israelis put yourself in the shoes of the palestinians. and talked over the heads of the leadership
, the president's approval on handling foreign policy is more or less the split 46% approve, 40% disapprove. he was in the country 11 times over the last decade. here is a sample. >> here is the main palace, the living quarters. it was struck in the first 36 hours of war. it is in this courtroom that he could face justice. he could be in this very chair on trial before the judicial system that he controlled and manipulated for 35 years. reporter: members of the iraqi government say they will likely keep the arc of victory as a reminder of just how brutal saddam hussein really was. jenna: we are so used to seeing him and not drill. >> a long time and a few pounds ago. jenna: what are your reflections? >> my first time was with secretary rumsfeld in iraq. really from 9/11 onward. on the first trip, it was in a bus like a giant fishbowl. a glass bus going down the middle of baghdad. there was not an insurgency. we didn't have jackets on as we worked through baghdad. that dramatically changed over time, as you know. it really exploded to the point surge that was implemented under general betray pet
dominated politics on three issues -- foreign policy, taxes, and social issues. among social issues, they won the battle and lost the war. there is no single social issue in your favor going forward. on taxes, you stand for giving breaks to the rich. they didreign policy, not support the bush foreign policy, so the stoll that made that republican party dominant come all three issues are in democratic favre. until you deal with these problems, it does not matter until network -- it does not matter what network you have. conservatives and, smaller government, less intrusion, and with they will have to figure out how to mollify the social movement. >> i do not think anyone has suggested the only thing that republicans are waiting right now is doing any better data bases and do we need more storefront offices. i was responding to a question directly about that. there is a lot of discussion going on right now about positioning, policies, looking for some of integrating new program pauses, how do we explain our policies better. i do not accept the premise that there is no doubt when you l
nations, united states is coming up too much with foreign policy and helping the fallen in getting involved too much. -- getting involved with foreign nations too much. u.n. another call on the did you want to weigh in on that? way it ist is not the seen in the world, where people feel the united states is not engaged enough after recent years. host: nathan guttman is with jewish daily forward and said arikat with al-quds. question had a quick and i would like a clarification of it. that the two me state solution is dead. the situation is static. here is my question. understood that all of the palestinians in the west bay and in gaza, are they subject -- in the west bank and in gaza, are they subject to israel? do we have a situation where palestinians do not get rights? guttman? the minority of the palestinians in east jerusalem do have is really i.d. cards. arelegal terms is that they an occupied population. guest: absolutely. the occupation that has gone on for far too long has denied palestinians the most basic of rights. israelis can arrest people, as we have seen last night.
is political advisor, he is not a foreign policy expert as least the last time i looked, and yet he is sending memos to the secretary of state on benghazi. let me say i don't think there is anything improper about that but certainly underlines the political nature of the administration's handling of the post-benghazi environment. and i can't wait to read these memos. i'm sure they will be a real treat. i think it will simply increase demands in congress for answers about the real facts of benghazi that after six months we still haven't gotten skbri mean, the thoughts on hacking, everybodies that -- everybody has their feeling how this should be handled the law doesn't crack down on people's ability to tap into private exchanges. one thing i think it truly highlights here, if there is a need in social media, even extending into the law breakers, to learn more about what happened, it does, does it not, say something about the energy in this country to produce some truth in this matter? >> yeah. i think there should be more protection for intellectual property on the internet, for people's own co
the detention facility at guantanamo consistent with the national security and foreign policy interests of the united states and interest of justice i hereby order. >> barbara star, pentagon correspondent, is at the pentagon and sunny hostin is in new york. barbara, to you first, what more do we know about their protests, and how is it being handled? >> well, there are a couple of things happening here, don. some of them have regularly protested now for years, and the medical protocol if there is a doctor's decision, yes, they are fed through a tube. some of them have joined this hunger on and off again hunger strike recently, we're told, because of protests over searches in their living area for koran, the holy book of islam. military officials tell us only islamic personnel, translators, if you will, actually touch the korans during the searches of their cells, u.s. military personnel do not touch the koran. but this has led to some of the protests and is one of the reasons behind the growing hunger strike. >> sunny, to you now, if a prisoner wants to refuse food, is that not their le
to be realistic. the young people who are there and who applauded ally will not be shaping foreign policy and we have to deal with the government that exists. it's a coalition government of really intense contradictions and we, therefore, have to be very clear in asserting what we consider to be the vital interests of the united states which are automatically good for israel. because if the united states is healthy and strong and predominant in the region, israel is totally secure. let's not forget, sdentally something very important which the press hasn't played up at all in recent months but yet it is a very telling fact. israel and the united states tend to be almost completely isolated in the middle east. not only in terms of the middle eastern countries but in terms of world opinion. look at the vote in the u.n. when we made every single effort possible to discourage countries from voting in favor of palestinian membership in the u.n. how many votes out of 190, out of 190 did we get? we found only seven countries to support us. this tells us something. and, therefore, we have to be very, ve
foreign policy? how are we doing muddling through this remarkable period of uncertainty? >> you know, i think we're muddling through is the best way i can put it. certain steps i think that have been positive, many that have been negative. i think the president when we saw the demonstrations in 2011 what the president did in calling for the end of hosni mubarak to step down this is a recognition this is a big deal and we need to get on the side of the populations understanding the public will be more empowered. other governments dictatorship, regimes in the gulf, close allies let's admit nondemocratic allies saw that and were frightened and they bring this up when they talk to their american partners. >> the saudis were on the phone. >> we saw you do that to mubarak. are we next? there are consequences to doing that. it's a error and we're feeling our way around. nine fairness we didn't immediately step in. we didn't see people revolting and automatically take the side of the people. we waited on that. we are late across the region. we're supportive of a syrian revolution and clamping
. and he doesn't understand that what that does is create a lack of trust. in foreign policy, the one thing i learned working with george herbert walker bush is that the most important thing in the world is for people to trust america and to have a feeling that america will be there in dealing with the national security issues. on both counts, this president obama has lost. >>steve: it is curious, because if you're just watching -- if you saw the president with netanyahu yesterday, you would think they're getting along great. in the past, for all intents and purposes, it seemed like they hated each other. the fact that b.b. netanyahu used to go to school with mitt romney, that didn't help things. but there is a quote today that apparently a senior israeli official said there was -- quote -- "a tacit agreement apparently between both leaders, if not coordination, to engage in a very intense public display of affection." >>alisyn: good. fantastic. if president obama's visit to israel helps them smooth over the tensions they had in the past and forge some sort of friendship, fantastic. even if
of these things in the world that richard travels in, the foreign policy hands writer establishment there was a great uproar when this came out and i think most people had never seen anything quite like it from a leader in the middle east. >> fair statement. >>> coming up on "morning joe," the rise of the retrowife. why a new group of modern feminists saying having it all really means staying at home? we will discuss this with campbell brown, cosmo's joanna coles and the bbckatty kay. . ♪ for tapping into a wealth of experience. for access to one of the top wealth management firms in the country. for a team of financial professionals who provide customized solutions. for all of your wealth management and retirement goals, discover how pnc wealth management can help you achieve. visit pnc.com/wealthsolutions to find out more. in the middle of the night it can be frustrating. it's hard to turn off and go back to sleep. intermezzo is the first and only prescription sleep aid approved for use as needed in the middle of the night when you can't get back to sleep. it's an effective slee
of improvement, but the unemployment rate remains elevated. the house foreign affairs committee examines of the u.s. to the syrian civil war. ben bernanke on monetary policy. a news conference with president obama and prime minister netanyahu. >> 70,000 people have been killed since protests began again syrian president assad. u.s. ambassador to syria, robert ford, testified at a house foreign affairs committee along with state department and usaid officials examining the u.s. response to the syrian civil war. this is two hours and 15 minutes. >> this hearing will come to order to sto. we need to review the syrian crisis. it was two years ago last week on the nightly news that we saw those protesters walking through .he street, chanting, peaceful what the world saw next without the syrian forces opened up with small arms fire on the marchers. over the ensuing weeks, that was followed by materially -- artillery barrage is and tanks and aerial apartment and finally i scud missiles into cities. two years into that syria and uprising. years, u.s. policy has been a drift. the obama administration saw
for so many years now. what are the prospects of that taking place. we know former foreign minister, with so much difficulty as policy minister, she will be at this dinner saturday night with netanyahu, john kerry and others trying to restart the peace talks. >> i would say to john kerry, good luck with that. if the americans really push for a renewed peace talks between the israelis and palestinians, i believe it will happen. neither side want to be the side that says no. will it be a real peace process with prospects of serious progress? i don't think so. and most analysts don't think so. because neither side is rooting for it. i always believe that time they are progress towards peace between the two sides is when each side realizes the limit of its own power. when israel realizes its weaponry will not sub jucate the palestinians forever and time is not on their side forever. until each side realizes that, i don't think there will be any real progress. there is no real demand for progress. it is also important to say that if there was a peace agreement on the table, i'm sure, and
and relatively wealthy russians. about a third of the deposits in cyprus we know are foreign. a large chunk of them are russian. russia didn't get the eurozone into this mess. russia has been there to help. >> cyprus knows having turned to russia for help, it's policy makers who are opposed to higher tax on higher earnings in those banks and it is to some extent an ironic legacy because it was russia's bank failures that made cyprus a part of russians keeping their money in safer places offshore and reinvesting when the appropriate time came and now it's the same crisis in the eurozone which is driving the pendulum back the other way. steve, can you give us a sense of what happens now in moscow? >> well, there's many, many ways that the russians could lose out on this under the current plan. the risk of default. risk of changes to domestic tax rates that we have been alluded to that are attractive for those russian companies in cyprus. in terms of the broader solution, whether it is just the changing of the terms of that 2.5 billion euro loan, an extension, another 5 billion which is sensib
netanyahu netanyahu. i always find it we're when they give foreign leaders nick names. it seems overly friendly beyond the level of policy and i don't mind it in your own personal life, but when you are in public call each other by your real names, please. >> kind of like blare bear never caught on. >> hal: exactly. that's peculiar to me. you wouldn't go vlad and i -- when you are talking to vladimir putin. so -- >> and it's not a very masculine nickname, either. >> hal: no bee bee is like a tiny little sphere. bb is substitute word when you can't pronounce things. >> obama: it's nice to get away from congress. >> hal: just when they are yelling to start the music, and you hear president obama lean over, it's good to get away from congress. you know how bad things are in your relationship with congress that you go to israel to talk about peace -- i think it was gilbert gilbert gottfried who said there was this genie and he says i'll grant you unwish. the palestinians and the jews have been fighting forever, would you please do something about it. and he said i can't
his first foreign trip to the middle east, how do you see his policy and can he achieve something in his second term? to keep the focus on the big question before us, which is the lessons of a decade of war. given that the general mentioned how war does not often turn out the way you want it to, as the air battle concept would be too much towards. that towards investment would put into iraq -- the and this meant we put into iraq shifted attention from asia? said regarding one of the, with in history, 3 packets of a regime but they were doing this for 3 decads. ites. it's only in the end that the u.s. learned of weapons. all regime was brutal \all the time. world one the whole a table. expenditures on iraq affected our ability to operate elsewhere? the united states is the number one superpower. we have the largest economy. so we manage to remain engaged in other parts of the world. but that does not refer to the proposition that the war iraq was excessively expensive, not only morally but financially and physically. and it has not contributed to great regional stability but has an
Search Results 0 to 40 of about 41 (some duplicates have been removed)